Fluid Regeneration: Parramatta Wanderings, Bracken Fern 1

Antonia Aitken

Ink and watercolour on paper reproduced on vinyl
2019

Standing strong on the Paramatta river lands, the ancient paperbarks have witnessed great change. As a child I would peel pieces of bark from the trunk and brush the velvet skin against my cheek. I was interested in the colours and forms I found within the layers of bark; taking me from a micro to a macro experience of place. Many species of the Myrtaceae family have important material and medicinal properties. The local Dharug and Dharawal communities use the Melaleuca styphelioides (prickly-leaved paperbark) for its antiseptic oils to treat colds, influenza and infections. The bark is also used to wrap and carry.

Commissioned by HARC for the Westmead Hospital Redevelopment Project

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Parramatta Wanderings: Paperbark 1
Standing strong on the Paramatta river lands, the ancient paperbarks have witnessed great change. As a child I would peel pieces of bark from the trunk and brush the velvet skin against my cheek. I wanted to capture the flow and caress of the river through the movement of paperbark leaves. Many species of the Myrtaceae family have important material and medicinal properties. The local Darug and Dharawal communities use the prickly-leaved paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides) for its antiseptic oils to treat colds, flu and infections

Warami-Westmead acknowledges the Dharug people, the traditional custodians of the land upon which the Westmead Health Precinct stands and recognises their continuous connection to culture, community and Country.

© Health and Arts Research Centre Inc 2021